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Shutdown Hike #1 – Bear Church Rock – Shenandoah NP

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Hike Summary

So, the government is shut down, and that means that the National Parks and National Forests are … technically closed.

This isn’t exactly stopping anyone from going out and hiking, myself included. I consider this an act of civil disobedience, and if caught I’ll comply with the authorities and remove myself. I understand the risks. I just want to go out there and hike, and I’m not going to let some jerks in our legislative branch keep me from doing so.

So, that’s that. I’d planned on doing some hikes that start from Skyline Drive, in order to take advantage of the beautiful foliage changes at this time of the year, peak season for Shenandoah, but alas, that’s proving somewhat difficult.

So, alternatives must be found. There are plenty of places where the trailheads are outside of the park, and so I drove out to almost the limit of my distance from home (within 90 minutes) to check out this hike, in the central section, down below Madison.

It was quite warm as I set out on my hike, no need for a jacket this time. It was a little hazy and overcast, but pleasant. I followed the trail along the Rapidan River, and caught some pretty reflections of the water in the morning light. The Rapidan is a cheerful little river at this point, full of trout waiting to be fished.

Soon, there was an intersection ahead, and I followed the Staunton River trail uphill, which unsurprisingly, follows the Staunton River, another pleasant little cascade. There are lots of rocks and things for it to fall over, making a very musical sound as it winds its way downhill. There’s supposed to be a swimming hole along the river at some point, but I wasn’t quite sure where it was.

The trail was lined with pretty purple asters, and some other late season wildflowers. I saw blue lobelia and even some blue phlox, which is a flower I haven’t seen much since April.

Along the way, I saw a strange sight. I’ve seen plenty of rock walls and remnants of foundations and such during my hikes, but these were different. They almost seemed like retaining walls, or fortifications or something like that. I did a little research, but I couldn’t find anything in particular anywhere on the internet about these rock piles, so they’ll remain a mystery.

The trail came to an intersection, and a very steep uphill climb. As I was making my way up, I saw a little toad making his way along, and I held out my hand. He hopped right up on my hand like it was no big thing, and stared at me for a while, allowing me to catch my breath some. I set him back down and he made his way into the drift of leaves, never to be seen again.

I decided to make a side trip for a good lunch eating spot at the Jones Mountain Cabin, which is owned by the PATC. It’s situated about 2/3 of the way up to the top, on a little side trail that’s about 1/3 of a mile. It would make a great afternoon hike and basecamp for exploring the other trails in the area. There’s a privy and a spring nearby, and some lovely trees that were changing color. There’s also a spicebush right next to the cabin, which lent a nice, fragrant smell to the immediate area.

After eating my snack, I set back out. The hike up to the top has a lot of switchbacks, and it seems forever with the steepness of the trail. There was one section lined with Mountain Laurels that had a slightly creepy look with the way their twisty trunks outlined the trail. If it hadn’t been such a nice day, it would have felt almost menacing.

Finally, after what seemed like the hundredth turn, I reached the top. It was a remarkable view. It wasn’t quite peak color yet, but the views were still glorious. So glorious, that I forgot to take pictures with my normal camera, and only took two with my phone! I am still kinda kicking myself over that one.

The only drawback was there were a large number of stink bugs up there, and although they’re pretty harmless, they’re also annoying, and they kept bumping into me, and attracting attention from my dog, who wanted to snack on them.

As I made my way back down, I encountered a couple of hikers. They were government workers who were on furlough, and decided to take advantage of their unexpected vacation by going for a hike. This was one of the first of several encounters on the way back. I ran across more hikers this day that I think I had in the previous month of hiking.

I decided to take an alternate path back instead of back down the Staunton River Trail. I had been tempted to extend my hike even further by hiking past Bear Church and heading up to the connection with the Rapidan River Trail, but I decided that that would have been a little too much hike.

All in all, this was a great day, and I think that Bear Church Rock, although somewhat far, is probably one of my favorite hikes in Shenandoah.

2013-10-04 Bear Church Rock
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5 responses »

  1. Did you have any issues using the parking lot in light of the shutdown?

    Reply
    • Nope, no issues since the lot is not actually on federal land, but just outside of it. I have also heard that some of the other lots are open (Berry Hollow), and some are closed (Old Rag), but I haven’t looked first hand yet.

      Reply
      • Great news. I heard the same about Old Rag and was concerned about the Graves Mill parking lot (I live a little more than 90 minutes away, so to arrive at a shuttered parking area would be a bummer). Thanks for sharing.

  2. I would like to try this hike – thanks for the nice description. I hike most weekends in Northern Virginia, or Maryland parks reasonably close to DC, and like to find blogs that give some detail about hikes I might try. I was pleased and amazed to find that you grew up near Mt. Tam. I am a Marin native whose early hiking experiences were on Mt. Tam , Pt Reyes, the MMWD, and the GGNRA. I hiked in the GGNRA before it was a national park, so you can tell I have been hiking a long time. We’ve been hiking the Piedmont, Blue Ridge, and Appalachian Plateau since we moved here in 1979. Loved finding your blog. Keep on hiking!

    Reply
  3. Thanks! I am probably going to do it again soon, and/or work in Dark Hollow Falls into the hike at some point. I’ll have to post an update when I do!

    Reply

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