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Woodstock Equestrian Park – Montgomery County, MD

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Hike Summary

Since I have been logging some pretty long and hard miles during my One Day Hike training hikes, I thought it would be a good idea on my “fun” hiking days to go on some shorter hikes that I might not normally do. I don’t know if it’s something in my slightly warped OCD brain that’s broken a little or what, but I have a hard time considering any hike under 10 miles to be much of a hike these days.

I need to learn to enjoy the short hikes, too.

I picked this hike at the last minute, thinking that this particular day there was going to be some snow or rain, but at mid morning the forecast said it was going to be nice, so I threw all my hiking stuff in my bag, loaded up the dog and headed up there.

Woodstock Equestrian Park is a relatively newish park in the more rural part of Montgomery County, Maryland. It is primarily intended as an equestrian park (duh) but the cross country course is just as usable for a hiker with their dog.

The park goes through rolling hills, mostly fields, with some thickets of trees interspersed here and there. The snow was starting to melt (it would be totally gone by the end of the next day) so at times it ended up being a little bit of a mudpit. Thank goodness for waterproof boots.

One of the nice things was that someone from the maintenance department had driven through with a vehicle of some sort, so there was a flattened strip of snow through the park, making it a little easier to get around.

At one point when I was hiking along, a herd of deer burst through the edge of the field and ran across it. I was so bemused taking in the scene that only at the last minute did I start to fumble for my phone and the camera. By the time I peeled off my gloves, they were gone. There was something enchanting about seeing them run across, they were almost floating over the snow.

There was a rich, tannic smell to the air at some points, hard to tell if it was the fields or just the smell of the thawing earth. At the time it smelled like spring, but now that I’m sitting, writing this with almost a foot of snow on the ground, it must have been a false spring.

I stopped for a snack and a rest at the Seneca Stone Barn. This is an old stone horse barn that was restored by the parks department when they were working on improving the park, and they did a very nice job. There’s a little information station explaining the history of the barn. I do wish there was a bench to sit on here, I had to make do with one of the thresholds instead.  That’s my only complaint though, and really I should be used to not having much to sit on but logs as it is.

Moving on, I exited the field section and made my way downhill and across the busy road. Then there was a section that was a bit more forested and a bit snowy as well. It was nice to have some bits that felt more like “real” hiking, with the enclosure of the forest. There was one section with a bit of a hill and a powerline clearing that was pretty.

At the bottom of the hill was a dirt road and the way back to the car. I had had a good leg stretching. and a place I have wanted to visit was on my route home.

Rocky Point Creamery. The last time I tried to visit this place was possibly around the same time last year when I’d gone to Sugarloaf, and of course it being still wintry, they are on limited hours. This time however, I was there when they were open!

They do have excellent ice cream, as I’ve found to be the case pretty much for all local type ice cream places I’ve visited. They’re a tiny smidge pricier than some of the other places I’ve been to, but that might just be the price difference between Maryland and Virginia. I didn’t mind, it was tasty. I had Banana Pudding and Butter Pecan flavors in a sundae with caramel, and it was an all-round great combination. They’re also part of the Maryland Ice Cream Trail, and I think when that rolls around again this year, I’m going to have to participate.

As I continued on, I was still a little bit hungry. I was back in Virginia, and what should my eyes see but a roadside BBQ stand. If there’s one thing I’ve found in my wanderings, it is that roadside BBQ is some of the best BBQ. This place is run by Catoctin Popcorn, who also have a location in Harper’s Ferry. I had some of their pulled pork with NC sauce, and it was delicious. I thought about suggesting to them that they set up a booth during the One Day Hike (they’re located just across the Potomac from the C&O trail,) but if they did that, I’d be tempted to stop and eat too much.

Woodstock Equestrian Park

Spotsylvania Courthouse Battlefield

Hike Summary

Wintry still, and another trip to a battlefield. The previous week was a total loss all round: although I’d gone for a drive, I ended up not taking many pictures and was just generally feeling like crap that week, so that explains the lack of posting.  The winter blues I suppose.

So, the Spotsylvania Courthouse Battlefield is one of 4 battlefields that make up the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park. It covers a huge part of two counties and a city, and I had a hard time at first getting my bearings with the whole thing. It was a little difficult to figure out where to get started, because unlike many of my other hikes, there was no preplanned route for me to follow from the wonderful people at Hiking Upward.

It took a bit of research on finding which park actually had a decent length loop hike, and Spotsylvania was the place. I did want to stop by the visitor center first though, so that is where I directed my GPS to go. The visitor center is in old town Fredericksburg, a place that I really need to spend some more time just exploring. My previous experiences have been limited to the movie theater that is located off of the interstate that we’ve been to a few times, but if the avalanche of tourism info I received from them is anything to go on, there’s a whole lot more stuff to do than meets the eye.

So, the visitor center was a bit gutted to say the least. All of the displays were currently removed and so there really wasn’t anything to see there. However, I got some helpful additional brochures, including interpretive directions for the Bloody Angle Trail, which was part of my hike. I also decided to stop in the gift shop, because I’m a sucker for gift shops and always like to buy things if they’re any good.

Again, no good stickers for my laptop. I continue to be disappointed in this regard. However, I did run across something that I was almost forced to get, and my inner 10-year-old is very happy:

A National Parks Passport. This is possibly a silly thing to have, but it’s also neat. It’s a little spiral bound book where you can get cancellation stamps of all the parks you’ve visited. Pretty much every National park has a cancellation stamp somewhere, and my inner completionist now has me wanting to revisit all the parks I’ve been to.  There are a lot of National Parks I’ve been to in this area, even if not all of them have hikeable places, but I am more than happy to go back again.

While I was there also I hiked around the very short Sunken Road walking tour, which was interesting, with a lot of ruins and foundations, as well as a hawk that I attempted to get a clearer picture of.

Legs stretched, we made our way to the Spotsylvania Battlefield, which was about a 20 minute drive from the visitor center.

There’s a little shelter, kind of like a highway rest stop, with some bathrooms and little informational overviews of the battlefield. There are some extra pamphlets and a donation box: this is one of the few National Parks I’ve been to that doesn’t require a fee to enter: the rangers told me that things are so spread out that it’s virtually impossible to enforce. That doesn’t seem to stop Shenandoah, who has fee forms at far-flung locations, but then again Shenandoah is probably considered to be one of the crown jewels of the parks system, plus they get all the Skyline fees.

The first part (and several parts, to be honest) are along the shoulder of the road that winds its way through the park. At first it was pretty mundane, with a lot of woods and road, not exactly the most compelling sort of hike. The weather had warmed up nicely over the last day, melting most of the snow, leaving only little rotten bits behind.

The trail finally veers off the road at Upton’s trail and starts to wind through the trees, and then breaks out of the trees into a field. There’s a monument here for Upton’s Charge, where he took 5000 men on an attack of the Confederate earthworks.

There are earthworks everywhere here at this battlefield, both sides put them up. Most of them are not much more than gentle ridges in the ground now, but they can still be seen fairly clearly from the air. There’s a rebuilt section of it later on in the hike (also accessible by the car tour)  where you can see what they looked like at the time of the war.

Like the other battlegrounds I’ve been to, this place is both steeped in history while at the same time somewhat banal. Sometimes it’s easier than other times at getting a grasp on the history, of being able to see exactly what went on here. It’s hard to see it sometimes when I’m hiking along and a helicopter from Quantico is buzzing overhead, or the traffic is making that sibilant shushing noise as it goes past. I’m thinking one of these days, possibly this year since it’s the anniversary, I’ll come and see a reenactment.

The Bloody Angle section was quite interesting, even though I did it backwards. There’s a special separate interpretive pamphlet for it, and there are signposts describing what went on that day. The Bloody Angle is similar to Bloody Lane in Antietam – a place of great slaughter. It’s named for the funny angle that the earthworks took in this section, where Major General Wright’s troops assaulted for almost 24 hours straight.

There are many ruined farmhouses along the way as well, since the poor farmers were basically caught in the crossfire, and had their houses burned down and destroyed by the troops to prevent sharpshooters from taking up places to snipe from. One of the ruins is a relatively new find, only rediscovered in the past couple of years.

I think my favorite part was the last bit, the Laurel Hill Loop. This is where the battle started. This was mainly open, rolling fields with a couple of markers. I liked the sense of openness at this section, with the blue sky overhead and a single large tree in the field.

Back at the car, I decided to stop at the Wilderness battlefield. I drove around that battlefield, but didn’t really get out of the car to look at much, it’s something I’ll definitely need to revisit, along with the Chancellorsville Battlefield site.

Since it was on the way, I couldn’t pass up an excuse to stop at one of my favorite places, Moo Thru. I love ice cream as you know, and this place serves some excellent stuff. It’s all from local cows, and they have a great selection of flavors in traditional as well as soft serve, and they’re pretty generous with their servings. They also have soups and sandwiches, the grilled cheese is delicious. I like to try to make a Neapolitan type sundae with strawberry, chocolate and vanilla, they didn’t have a plain vanilla so I went with caramel toffee instead, which was excellent. If you’re ever anywhere near Remington, I highly suggest stopping here.

Feb 20, 2014 Spotsylvania Battlefield